Home > Big Picture > Why Chris Brown’s “Loyal” Is His Latest Homage to Michael Jackson

Why Chris Brown’s “Loyal” Is His Latest Homage to Michael Jackson

Single cover of Chris Brown's "Loyal," from his 2014 album "X"

Single cover of Chris Brown’s “Loyal,” from his 2014 album “X”

One of the worst kept secrets in show business is that Chris Brown is a big fan of Michael Jackson. Since his first years of teenage success, Brown has pledged his loyalty to the departed singer/songwriter by singing his songs on stage, wear his iconic jackets during concerts and, of course, let’s not forget his tear-jerking tribute to Jackson at the BET Awards. On wax, on the other hand, you can’t find too many similarities between the two. This changed in the summer of 2013 with the release of “Fine China,” the lead single to his 2014 album X, which finds the Grammy-winning singer crooning over a Jackson-esque funk/pop track and exclaiming the gloved one’s signature vocal ad-libs (i.e. Whoo-Hoo’s and syncopated scatting). “Fine China” is a homage to MJ in a stylistic sense and sticks out among X‘s other hip-hop infused songs like “Love More” and “New Flame,” but it isn’t the only time Jackson’s influence rear’s it’s head on the album. “Loyal,” the fourth single from X, is a mid-tempo club banging anthem featuring Lil’ Wayne all about gold digger women. No one would ever mistake a song that has a hook that expresses, “These ho’s ain’t loyal,” and includes phrases such as “I don’t fuck with broke bitches” as being inspired by anything associated with Michael Jackson, but they should and here’s why.

Aside from being revered by millions as the greatest entertainer in music history, Michael Jackson was a singular songwriter who wrote vivid, brooding material culled from his very unusual life. Jackson was able to write songs of various subject matter, from love, injustice, and unity. However, one topic constantly came up: the deceptive female . Since the late 1970”s, MJ repeated the pattern in song many times:

1979 – “Working Day and Night,” Off the Wall – MJ’s girlfriend makes him work extensively to keep him from noticing her cheating ways.

1980 – “This Place Hotel (fka Heartbreak Hotel),” Triumph (with The Jacksons) – Mysterious women claim a false relationship with MJ, causing his
“baby” to leave him.

1982 – “Billie Jean,” Thriller – A woman falsely accuses MJ of fathering her child.

1987 – “Dirty Diana,” Bad – A notorious groupie pressures MJ to trade sex for stardom.

1991 – “Dangerous,” Dangerous – Same plot as “This Place Hotel,” only this time, MJ succumbs to temptation.

1995 – “Blood on the Dance Floor,” – Blood on the Dance Floor – A mysterious woman seduces, then kills, a man.

When these songs were released, Jackson fell under minimal, if any at all, criticism for portraying women in this hawking fashion. This is clearly evident by the public’s response to the songs; “Billie Jean” and “Dirty Diana” both rose to number one on the Billboard charts, “This Place Hotel,” was an R&B Top ten hit, “Working Day and Night” was a live staple on every tour Jackson had since 1981, and “Dangerous” is among his most well known dance routines, performing it no less than five times on television between 1992 and 2001. Jackson explained his rationale behind these songs in his autobiography, Moon Walk: “If [“This Place Hotel’], and later “Billie Jean,” seemed to cast women in an unfavorable light, it was not meant to be taken as a personal statement,” Jackson wrote. “I just think that when sex is used as a form or blackmail or power, it’s a repugnant use of one of God’s gifts.”

Most people wouldn’t dare to compare Brown’s “Loyal” to anything Jackson’s recorded in his career. In fairness, this may be due to the lyrics. The chorus is frank and harsh, “When I rich nigga wants you/And your nigga can’t do nothing for you/These Ho’s ain’t loyal.” Also, Brown’s contribution to the song’s creation is minimal. In the liner notes, “Loyal” lists no less than eight people having writing credits for the song, whereas Jackson wrote all the lyrics of the six aforementioned songs and composed all but two (“Dangerous” and “Blood on the Dance Floor” were both composed by Teddy Riley). Lastly, some would say Brown has a bitter and skewed view of women in light of his tumultuous relationship with pop singer Rihanna, while some would argue that Jackson’s point of view came from a more observational point of view and is much more objective. With all that said, the issue that Brown addresses in “Loyal” of being women being unfaithful (“I Betcha bottom dollar she gonna cheat”), disposing of men that can’t give them a certain lifestyle (see chorus) and will go to great lengths to trap stars (“She wanna see a nigga trapped/she wanna fuck all the rappers”) touches on numerous points that Jackson has made in several songs. The supposed misogyny attached to this material is understandable, but it doesn’t negate the fact that women like these do exist. As Jackson stated again in his book, “There were so many sharks in this business looking for blood in the water.” We mustn’t dismiss that ideal that there are females who use sex as a weapon for dishonorable gains just because the language on “Loyal” is crass. Given that fact that the song reached number nine on the Billboard 100, it’s safe to assume that many others co-sign with the song’s message. Brown still has a long way to go before he can be considered near the accomplishments of his hero, but like it or not, a song like “Loyal” is a step in the right direction to expanding ability to express via his music.

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Categories: Big Picture
  1. Tiffani Real
    October 12, 2014 at 6:39 am

    This is a great article. You brought up some very valid points.

  2. N. watson
    October 26, 2014 at 5:17 am

    We need more thought provoking and well written blogs like this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. ecosten
    January 12, 2015 at 9:26 pm

    You construed this to your own meaning. Chris uses a disrespectful interpretation. Michael had more respect. Michael used better English in his lyrics as well.

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